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Papers

This is an archive of my writings in PDF format.

Note that I’m updating these slowly … 

Copyright notice
Some works are: ©1999-2006 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.

Available now

1. Chapman, C.N., and Milham, R. P. (2006, October). The persona’s new clothes: methodological and practical arguments against a popular method.  Paper presented at Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES), 50th annual conference, San Francisco, CA, October 2006.

Abstract: We examine the popular Personas method and consider claims that personas can reflect empirical data and serve as an information source for development teams. We argue that there are significant methodological and practical difficulties for personas. It is difficult to determine how many, if any, users are represented by a persona, and thus is difficult to know whether a persona is relevant for intended users. Personas cannot be adequately verified or falsified and therefore have no demonstrable validity. We believe personas are likely to lead to political conflicts and to undermine the ability for researchers to resolve questions with data. We suggest potential research to evaluate the Personas method more thoroughly. Until the methodological issues are resolved, it is best not to consider personas to be a means to communicate data.

Full Paper: chapman-milham-personas-hfes2006-0139-0330.pdf.   Copyright (c) 2006, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 

2. Chapman, C. N., Deaton, L., Harris, A., and Robinson, N.  (1999, July).  A genetic algorithm system to find symbolic rules for diagnosis of depression.  Paper presented at the IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation, Washington, DC.

Abstract: A machine learning method is proposed for automatically finding psychiatric diagnostic rules. It is proposed that a genetic algorithm (GA) system can find symbolic, easily readable rules that could be used by psychiatric clinicians. Diagnosis of major depressive disorder is considered. A sample of 320 subjects with symptom information and pre-assigned diagnosis is used to train a GA model and two other statistical models, discriminant analysis and logistic regression. Each model is able correctly to classify more than 91% of cases. The GA model performs best of the three methods and yields readable, non-numeric rules.

Full Paper: chapman-genetic-algorithms-ieee-CEC-1999.pdf.  Copyright (c) IEEE 1999, as above. 

Soon to be available

Chapman, C. N.  (2006, January).  Fundamental ethics in information systems.  Paper presented at Hawaii International Conference on Systems Sciences, Poipu, HI, January 2006.

Chapman, C. N. (2005, August).  Writing acts: taxonomy and technological implications.  Presentation at North American Computing and Philosophy 2005, Corvallis, OR, August 2005.

Chapman, C. N. (2005, July).  An exploration of writing acts.  Paper presented at Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11th Annual Meeting, Cullowhee, NC, July 2005.

Chapman, C. N.  (2005).  Software user research: psychologist in the software industry.  In Morgan, R. D., Kuther, T. L., and Habben, C. J. (2005), Life After Graduate School in Psychology: Insider’s Advice from New Psychologists.  New York: Psychology Press, Ch. 16. 

Chapman, C. N. (2003, August).  Networks unraveling: IPv6 and conceptual shifts in networking.  Paper presented at the Computing and Philosophy 2003 conference, Corvallis, OR.

Chapman, C. N. (2003, July).  Networks and embedded knowledge: challenges for computer ethics.  Paper presented at the Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World 9th Annual Meeting, Santa Fe, NM. 

Chapman, C. N. (2002, July).  Designing software ethics.  Paper presented at the Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8th Annual Meeting, Santa Fe, NM.

Chapman, C. N.  (2001, July).  Thinking with Heidegger about software usability.  Paper presented at the Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World 7th Annual Meeting, Santa Fe, NM. 

Chapman, C. N.  (1997).  Freud’s critique of religion: neglect of the anxiety theory.  Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought, 20:1.

Not available (only available offline)

Chapman, C. N., Burgess, S., and Ball, V.  (2005, April).  User scenarios: design for real users while keeping engineers, PMs, planners and VPs happy.  Presented at User Experience Day 2005 (internal Microsoft conference), April 2005.

Chapman, C. N. (2004, July).  Psychology in the software industry: usable careers.  Presentation at the American Psychological Association 112th Annual Convention, Honolulu, HI, July 2004. 

Chapman, C. N., Graf, R., Marinelli, K., Palmen, H., Milham, R., Schneider, S., Lamberts, H., and Baker, K. (2003, June).  Wireless Internet Hotspots: Review of User Experience.  Presented at Ease of Use Roundtable, Chicago, IL.

Chapman, C. N. (2003, April).  Designing for users’ worlds: a philosophical approach.  Lecture in the Microsoft Technical Education series.  Redmond, WA. 

Chapman, C. N. (2002, August).  IPv6: Network Administrators’ Usability Concerns.  Presented at Ease of Use Roundtable, Boston, MA.

Chapman, C.R., Nakamura, Y., Donaldson, G.W., Jacobson, R.C., Bradshaw, D.H., Flores, L.Y., & Chapman, C.N. (2001). Sensory and affective dimensions of phasic pain are indistinguishable in the self-report and psychophysiology of normal laboratory subjects. Journal of Pain, 2:5, 279-294. 

Chapman, C. R., Nakamura, Y., and Chapman, C. N. (2000).  Pain and folk theory.  Brain and Mind, 1:209-222.

Donaldson G. W., Chapman C. R., Nakamura Y., Bradshaw D. H., Jacobson R. C., Chapman C. N.  Pain and the defense response: structural equation modeling reveals a coordinated psychophysiological response to increasing painful stimulation.  Pain, 102:1-2, 97-108. 

Roberts, B. W., & Chapman, C. N. (2000). Change in dispositional well-being and its relation to role quality: A 30-year longitudinal study. Journal of Research in Personality, 34, 26-41.

Chapman, C. N., Roberts, B. W., Krasts, M. J., Sinclair, R. R., and Woodsen, B. (1998).  1997 Summer academy evaluation.  In B. W. Roberts and R. R. Sinclair (eds.)  Oklahoma Teacher Education Collaborative: Mid-term Evaluation Report (pp. 9-52).  Unpublished technical report prepared for the National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. 

Chapman, C. N.  (1986).  Promote yourself.  Student Activities, October 1986.

Krasts, M. J., Heger, D., Sinclair, R. R., Roberts, B. W., and Chapman, C. N.  (1998, April).  Training outcomes and attitudes influenced by training motivation.  Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA. 

Roberts, B. W., and Chapman, C. N.  (1997, August).  A 30-year longitudinal study linking role quality with changes in dispositional well-being.  Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Roberts, B. W. Krasts, M. J., Chapman, C. N., and Sinclair, R. R. (1998).  Curriculum revision.  In B. W. Roberts and R. R. Sinclair (eds.)  Oklahoma Teacher Education Collaborative: Mid-term Evaluation Report (pp. 69-77).  Unpublished technical report prepared for the National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. 

Sinclair, R. R., Roberts, B. W. Krasts, and Chapman, C. N. (1998).  1997 Master teacher in residence (M-TIR) evaluation.  In B. W. Roberts and R. R. Sinclair (eds.)  Oklahoma Teacher Education Collaborative: Mid-term Evaluation Report (pp. 53-68).  Unpublished technical report prepared for the National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

Sinclair, R. R., Krasts, M. J., Roberts, B. W., and Chapman, C. N.  (1998).  Collaboration.  In B. W. Roberts and R. R. Sinclair (eds.)  Oklahoma Teacher Education Collaborative: Mid-term Evaluation Report (pp. 78-88).  Unpublished technical report prepared for the National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

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